iHuman volunteers key in preparing centre for troubled youth

An Edmonton inner-city agency that helps youth stay off the streets is turning to volunteers to help build a new home.

iHuman hoping to transform derelict warehouse into art and music studios

Lorris Williams, site manager at iHuman Youth Society's new building, supervises a volunteer crew from Fluent Security as it demolishes a ceiling. (CBC)

An Edmonton inner-city agency that helps youth stay off the streets is turning to volunteers to help build a new home.

"It's great; It really is; and it's just fun," said Tina Chae with Fluent Security, an Edmonton alarm company volunteering Thursday at iHuman Youth Society's new home.

The company usually goes overseas for its annual volunteer project, but this year staff is helping iHuman demolish and renovate the old derelict warehouse on 102A Street, Chae said.

"They're really impacting the city in a positive way," Chae said "They got this building but they didn't have the manpower to get it all ready."

Volunteers, who spent the day today knocking down a ceiling,  are vital to the project, said Lorris Williams, an iHuman volunteer managing the renovations.

"It gets a lot of intensive pre-work out of the way, so that when professionals are ready to come in, it's not something that they have to deal with."

iHuman is still looking for volunteer tradespeople to help with framing and electrical work over the winter.

It plans to open the two-storey, 22,000 square-foot building next spring.

iHuman helps 500 troubled youth stay off the streets through art and music.



 

With files from CBC's Niall McKenna

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