Researchers at the University of Alberta have created an Edmonton Oilers logo so small that more than 900 million of them could fit on top of a single NHL puck.

The logo, 40 times smaller than the width of a human hair, is only 2.4 micrometres in diameter, the U of A's science faculty said in a news release Friday.

There is no word from the university on how the little logo will help the Oilers beat the Ducks in Friday's Game 5 of their second round playoff series. 

The U of A's Nanofabrication and Characterization Facility, known as nanoFAB, developed the logo by using a nanomaterial.

The logo was developed by Applied Quantum Materials, a spinoff company run by chemistry professor Jon Veinot, and nanoscale pattern correction methods developed by Applied Nanotools, another U of A spinoff.

"The University of Alberta is a clear leader in Canada, if not the world, in nanomaterials synthesis and materials chemistry," Veinot said in a statement.

The new logo is the second Oilers graphic developed by the nanoFAB team. The first was created for the 2006 playoff run.

That one was small enough to fit into the team's regular jersey logo 16 million times.

The new logo is more than 40 times smaller than the first. It can only be seen under the university's helium ion microscope, one of only three in Canada.

Eric Flaim, director of nanoFAB, said the new logo shows the kind of development that nanotechnology has seen over the last decade.