An Edmonton veterinary clinic is offering to spay and neuter dozens of cats and dogs living in a shack at the Enoch First Nation west of the city.

"We just feel really compelled to be able to step up and take care of these cats and dogs, so we've offered to spay and neuter as many of the cats and dogs as possible," said Susie Sykes, with the Edmonton Veterinarians Emergency Clinic.

The veterinarians will donate their time.

"How can you say no to these cats? EVEC is an emergency pet hospital staffed 24/7 by amazing doctors," she said. "They're really talented."


Danny Lapotac holds one of the 50 cats who made their home at his shack on the Enoch First Nation. (CBC)

The situation started when Danny Lapotac, the man who lives in the shack, took in a couple of stray cats including one that he later learned was pregnant. The animals continued breeding and the numbers got out of control.

"I'm the kind of guy that can't see a live animal that can't look after itself," he said on Wednesday. "They came to be part of my family. We came to be close. They trust me and I trust them."

Janice Dodds, the Edmonton-area woman who brought pet food to Lapotac and tried to get the animals fixed as cash donations came in, returned to the shack on Wednesday night to take a load of cats to the emergency veterinary clinic.

Dodds helped raise awareness about Lapotac's dilemma and is thanking the public for the overwhelming support that resulted from media reports. 

"The response has been amazing," Dodds said. "I still have 40 people to call back."

One woman donated $500 and Dodds has already found homes for three of the cats.

Lapotac says it was stressful to care for so many animals and he appeared relieved that the situation was finally being resolved.

"I'm happy," he said. " I'm really, really grateful with what's happening."