Edmonton push-up master claims unofficial world record

The Edmonton retiree barely broke a sweat as he smashed the Guinness world record for most knuckle push-ups in a minute, performing 91 before a crowd of supporters cheering for him inside a NAIT gymnasium.

'I figured I better do this now. I'm not getting any younger,' said Al Waselenchuk

Retired Edmonton bus driver, Al Waselenchuk, 65, broke the record for knuckle pushups. Waselenchuk came in to Edmonton AM to talk about the record and demonstrate his strength. 2:05

A flash of muscle and grey hair, knotted arms tensed, Al Waselenchuk carefully places his knuckles on the hardwood and muscles his way through a frenetic display of push-ups.

"I was stressed. I didn't want to embarrass myself in front of all those people. I didn't figure at my age that I'd get nervous," Waselenchuk said during a Wednesday morning interview on CBC Radio's Edmonton AM.

"But it felt pretty good when it was all over."

The Edmonton retiree barely broke a sweat as he smashed the Guinness world record for most knuckle push-ups in a minute, performing 91 on Tuesday afternoon before a crowd of supporters cheering for him inside a NAIT gymnasium.

"I figured I better do this now. I'm not getting any younger," he said.

Knuckle push-ups are a new obsession for the retired bus driver.

Unimpressed with the latest record attempt by a  "scrawny" guy from India named KJ Joseph, who put in a claim for 82 last month, Waselenchuk decided to limber up.

"I thought geeze, that's achievable," Waselenchuk said. "I figured I could do better."

 

The 65-year-old only started training for the feat last November, working out in his basement, and playing the occasional game of volleyball at NAIT.

"I was feeling a little overweight. A little out of shape," he said.  "I ended up losing 22 pounds, but I would have liked to lose more off my stomach."

Waselenchuk will submit video and witness statements from his performance to Guinness for authentication. He`ll know within six to eight weeks if he made the cut.  

"They get upwards of 150,000 applications per day for all kinds (of awards), like ironing laundry for five hours, all kinds of silly things like that, so they are very busy over there."

Even if he fails to earn a spot in the record books, Waselenchuk has no regrets,. He said he is looking forward to giving his calloused knuckles a rest.  

"If I don't make it, I don't make it. I don't know whether I will attempt it again."

 

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