There will be a piper and a parade into the city room at Edmonton city hall today as nomination day kicks off precisely at 9 a.m.

"Right now we have 93 people who have filed a notice of intent," Iain MacLean, director of elections, said Friday.

That number only includes those who intend to run for seats on city council, since school board candidates don't have to file notices of intent, MacLean said. 

"It's a very exciting day," he said of nomination day.

"It's very interesting to see the enthusiasm about getting ready to gear up for the final campaigning stretch before election day."

Nominations close at noon.

A complete candidate list will be ready around 4 p.m.

At that time, any unopposed candidate for a council or school board seat will win by acclamation.

That could potentially happen in Ward 1, where incumbent Andrew Knack was the only candidate as of Friday.

According to city records, the only municipal candidate to be elected by acclamation "recently" was William Hawrelak, who in the 1950s was twice elected mayor by acclamation.

Signatures, deposits required

When filing for nomination, candidates for mayor will have to provide 100 signatures and a deposit of $500.

Council and school trustee candidates must provide a $100 deposit and at least 25 signatures from eligible electors in their wards.

There is a chance some candidates will get their deposit money back.

Deposits are returned to candidates who get at least 50 per cent of the votes of the winning candidate in their race, MacLean said.

The 2013 municipal election was the first time candidates were elected for four-year terms, up from three years.

"The interesting part of having that extra year is we've seen more by-elections than we've had in the past," said MacLean."That could potentially happen moving forward as well."

There have been two byelections since the last municipal election in 2013. Sarah Hoffman vacated her Ward G public school board seat to run in the 2015 provincial election, and Amarjeet Sohi left his Ward 12 council seat to run in the 2015 federal election.

Election day staff needed

People looking to pick up extra work may want to apply to work at polling stations on election day.

"We need to hire 3,000 people," MacLean said. "So we will keep that open for another three or four weeks."

People wanting information about the election are encouraged to visit the city's election website.

"One of the biggest questions that we get — where do I vote?" said MacLean.

A Where to Vote tool on the election website gives voters that information when they provide their address.

city hall

A full list of candidates running for mayor, council, public and Catholic school trustee should be ready by 4 p.m. Monday. (Lydia Neufeld/CBC)