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#DIYcity has people re-inventing Edmonton's public spaces

Little by little, Edmontonians made their city just a little bit different Sunday: just a touch more colourful, a tiny bit more playful.

Dozens of projects across the city transform alleyways, greenbelts and city parks

A heart garden by Reconciliation in Solidarity Edmonton, one of the many #DIYcity projects across the city today. (Linda Hoang)

Little by little, Edmontonians made their city just a little bit different Sunday: just a touch more colourful, a tiny bit more playful.

Pop-up playgrounds and alleyway art were just some of the dozens of projects created for #DIYCity. The day-long event encouraged people to do something — anything — to re-invent and re-imagine Edmonton's public spaces.

"Your sense of love for your city is very much rooted in place," said Chris Gusen with Make Something Edmonton told CBC's Tim Adams on Friday.

The organization worked alongside the Edmonton's CITYlab to plan the day. Gusen said Make Something Edmonton provided some micro-grants to help some of the projects along. However, he said they made an effort to be as hands-off as possible, wanting to inspire people to develop their own ideas.

"We just have to plant a little bit of a seed. But really, this is a day that is being invented by Edmontonians," he said.

Hear the full interview with Chris Gusen

Listen to the interview here

It's meant wildly different ideas: Gusen mentioned that one project involved hiding notes from a mischievous garden gnome somewhere in the Mill Creek ravine, while another group has planned a concert on one of Edmonton's footbridges.

Many of the projects, such as a heart garden created by Reconciliation in Solidarity Edmonton, mark the fact that National Aboriginal Day is also being held today.

Make Something Edmonton has created a map of some of the #DIYCity projects around Edmonton.  Are you taking part, by creating a project or just visiting one? Send us your photos to @CBCEdmonton on Twitter or our Facebook page.

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