Alberta 'turning heads' at Paris climate change conference

Alberta’s new climate change policy is being warmly received at the United Nations Climate Change gathering in Paris according to Environment Minister Shannon Phillips.

'We have unveiled a robust package of policies we believe signals our willingness to do our part'

Environment Minister Shannon Phillips smiles at Premier Rachel Notley after unveiling Alberta's climate strategy in Edmonton on Nov. 22. Phillips is championing the plan at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris. (The Canadian Press)

Alberta's new climate change policy is being warmly received at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris according to Environment Minister Shannon Phillips. 

It's "turning heads," Phillips said Tuesday from Paris, where she is attending the gathering.

"We have unveiled a robust package of policies we believe signals our willingness to do our part.

"It was a surprise to most people who are observers of Canadian and Alberta politics," said Phillips referring to Alberta's plan to put a price on carbon and cap greenhouse gas emissions.

How the Alberta plan will fit into Canada's overall climate change strategy will be hammered out in negotiations with the federal government in the new year.

While the world is lauding Alberta's new approach to climate change, Albertans seem to be less welcoming.

A recent poll indicated most Albertans are not in favor of paying a carbon tax.

Phillips said Alberta's plan is a "long process" that will roll out over several months. Many details will be revealed in the next provincial budget expected in March 2016, she added.

She's confident Albertans will support the plan, the more they learn about it.

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