Video

Alberta researchers track elusive wolverines in new documentary

Filmmaker Andrew Manske's spent three years, sometimes in extreme discomfort, to capture images of the notoriously reclusive creatures.

Film captures animals in rare HD footage

After weeks in the blind with no wolverine sightings, Andrew finally sees one which he affectionately nicknames "Bandit". 1:12

A new documentary for CBC's The Nature of Things tracks the elusive wolverine through northern Alberta, all in an effort to capture rare HD footage of the animal in its natural habitat.

Filmmaker Andrew Manske's spent three years, sometimes in extreme discomfort, to capture images of the notoriously reclusive creature. He spent 72 hours in one excursion waiting to get a good shot of a wolverine called Logan. 

To help his project, Wolverine: Ghost of the Northern Forest, and learn more about the animals' behavior, Manske met with researchers from The Wolverine Project.

Led by biologists Dr. Mark Boyce and Matt Scrafford from the University of Alberta, it is the most wide-ranging study of wolverine ecology ever undertaken in North America.

Boyce, a veteran wilderness scientist, said he is in awe of this animal. 

"Wolverines live in the most remote places that you can find on the planet," he said. "In the heart of the Rocky Mountains, in some of the most rugged terrain imaginable, wolverines seem to be able to move through that country and make a living at it."

CBC's The Nature of Things gets up close to an animal few will ever see. We'll get a preview of "Wolverine: Ghost of the Northern Forest". 6:57

For more information on the Nature of Things documentary and Andrew Manske's quest to track the wolverine see link here.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.