Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older.

Data released Tuesday from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65 — shows the median age across Canada in 2011 was 40.6 years. By 2016, the country will be home to as many senior citizens as children, Statistics Canada projects.

Despite the growing number of seniors, Canada remains one of the youngest in the industrialized world. Among G8 countries, only the United States and Russia have a lower percentage of citizens aged 65 and over.

Use the links or scroll to see information about census metropolitan areas, which are any area with a population of at least 100,000, where the urban core of that area has at least 50,000 people.

Charlottetown

Senior citizens now represent 17.4 per cent of the population of Charlottetown, a ratio higher than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 6,015 people in Charlottetown were 65 or older. The ratio of 17.4 per cent of the population compares to a national average of 14.8 and a provincial average of 16.3 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 17.3 per cent of the population of Charlottetown were seniors. 

The number of children in Charlottetown — those 14 and under — has increased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 14 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 16.4 per cent. 

Those in the working-age population in Charlottetown — people 15 to 64 — represent 68.6 per cent of the city's residents. That’s up from the 2006 census when 67.9 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of Charlottetown was 42.3 years, compared with 41.3 years in 2006.

Back to top

 

St. John's

Senior citizens now represent 12.7 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of St. John's, a ratio lower than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 25,055 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of St. John's were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 12.7 per cent of the population compares to a national average of 14.8 and a provincial average of 16 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 11.5 per cent of the metropolitan population of St. John's were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of St. John's — those aged 14 and under — has increased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 15.9 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 14.9 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the St. John's region — people aged 15-64 — represent 71.4 per cent of the area's residents. That’s down from the 2006 census when 72.4 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan St. John's area was 39.4 years, compared with 38.4 years in 2006.

Back to top 

Corner Brook

Senior citizens now represent 19.2 per cent of the population of Corner Brook, a ratio higher than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

The census showed 3,815 people in Corner Brook were 65 or older. The ratio of 19.2 per cent of the population compares to a national average of 14.8 and a provincial average of 16 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 17.5 per cent of the population of Corner Brook were seniors. 

The number of children in Corner Brook — those 14 and under — has decreased since the last census. 

The new data shows children make up 13.9 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 14.9 per cent. 

Those in the working-age population in Corner Brook — people 15 to 64 — represent 66.9 per cent of residents. That's down from the 2006 census when 67.8 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of Corner Brook was 45.8 years, compared with 43.6 years in 2006.

Back to top 

Fredericton

Senior citizens now represent 15.7 per cent of the population of Fredericton, a ratio higher than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 8,800 people in Fredericton were 65 or older. The ratio of 15.7 per cent of the population compares to a national average of 14.8 and a provincial average of 16.5 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 15 per cent of the population of Fredericton were seniors.  

The number of children in Fredericton — those 14 and under — has increased since the last census. 

The new data shows children make up 14.7 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 15.1 per cent. 

Those in the working-age population in Fredericton — people aged 15-64 — represent 69.6 per cent of the city's residents. That's down from the 2006 census when 70.3 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of Fredericton was 38.7 years, compared with 38.4 years in 2006.

Back to top 

Halifax

Senior citizens now represent 13.1 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of Halifax, a ratio lower than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 51,105 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of Halifax were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 13.1 per cent of the population compares to a national average of14.8 and a provincial average of 16.6 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 12.1 per cent of the metropolitan population of Halifax were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of Halifax — those 14 and under — has decreased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 15.3 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 15 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the Halifax region — people aged 15-64 — represent 71.6 per cent of the area's residents. That’s down from the 2006 census when 71.8 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan Halifax area was 39.9 years, compared with 39 years in 2006. 

Nationally, the median age in 2011 was 40.6 years and the provincial median age was 43.7 years.

Back to top 

Moncton

Senior citizens now represent 14.6 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of Moncton, a ratio lower than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 20,260 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of Moncton were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 14.6 per cent of the population compares to a national average of14.8 and a provincial average of 16.5 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 13.7 per cent of the metropolitan population of Moncton were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of Moncton  — those 14 and under — has increased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 15.5 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 15.1 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the Moncton region — people aged 15 to 64 — represent 69.9 per cent of the area's residents. That’s down from the 2006 census when 70.3 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan Moncton area was 40.4 years, compared with 39.4 years in 2006. 

Nationally, the median age in 2011 was 40.6 years and the provincial median age was 43.7 years. 

Back to top 

Saint John

Senior citizens now represent 15.1 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of Saint John, a ratio higher than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 19,320 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of Saint John were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 15.1 per cent of the population compares to a national average of 14.8 and a provincial average of 16.5 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 13.9 per cent of the metropolitan population of Saint John were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of Saint John — those aged 14 and under — has decreased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 16.4 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 15.1 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the Saint John region — people 15 to 64 — represent 68.5 per cent of the area's residents. That’s down from the 2006 census when 68.7 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan Saint John area was 41.9 years, compared with 40.5 years in 2006.

Back to top 

Montreal

Senior citizens now represent 14.6 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of Montreal, a ratio lower than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 559,840 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of Montreal were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 14.6 per cent of the population compares to a national average of 14.8 and a provincial average of 15.9 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 13.6 per cent of the metropolitan population of Montreal were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of Montreal — those 14 and under — has increased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 16.5 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 15.9 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the Montreal region — people 15 to 64 — represent 68.8 per cent of the area's residents. That’s down from the 2006 census when 69.3 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan Montreal area was 39.7 years, compared with 39.3 years in 2006. 

Back to top 

Toronto

Senior citizens now represent 12.7 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of Toronto, a ratio lower than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 706,665 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of Toronto were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 12.7 per cent of the population compares to a national average of14.8 and a provincial average of 14.6 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 11.9 per cent of the metropolitan population of Toronto were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of Toronto — those 14 and under — has increased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 17.5 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 17 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the Toronto region — people 15 to 64 — represent 69.9 per cent of the area's residents. That’s up from the 2006 census when 69.5 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan Toronto area was 38.6 years, compared with 37.5 years in 2006.

Back to top 

Hamilton

Senior citizens now represent 16 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of Hamilton, a ratio higher than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 115,560 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of Hamilton were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 16 per cent of the population compares to a national average of 14.8 and a provincial average of 14.6 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 15.1 per cent of the metropolitan population of Hamilton were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of Hamilton — those 14 and under — has decreased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 16.6 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 17 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the Hamilton region — people aged 15 to 64 — represent 67.3 per cent of the area's residents. That’s up from the 2006 census when 67 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan Hamilton area was 41.2 years, compared with 39.9 years in 2006.

Back to top 

Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo

Senior citizens now represent 12.5 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of Kitchener — Cambridge — Waterloo, a ratio lower than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 59,460 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of Kitchener — Cambridge — Waterloo were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 12.5 per cent of the population compares to a national average of 14.8 and a provincial average of14.6 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 11.6 per cent of the metropolitan population of Kitchener — Cambridge — Waterloo were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of Kitchener — Cambridge — Waterloo — those aged 14 and under — has remained about the same since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 18.1 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 17 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the Kitchener — Cambridge — Waterloo region — people 15 to 64 — represent 69.4 per cent of the area’s residents. That's about the same as the 2006 census when 69.3 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan Kitchener — Cambridge — Waterloo area was 37.6 years, compared with 36.4 years in 2006.

Back to top 

London

Senior citizens now represent 15 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of London, a ratio higher than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 71,100 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of London were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 15 per cent of the population compares to a national average of 14.8 and a provincial average of 14.6 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 13.8 per cent of the metropolitan population of London were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of London — those 14 and under — has decreased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 16.6 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 17 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the London region — people aged 15 to 64 — represent 68.4 per cent of the area's residents. That’s about the same as the 2006 census when 68.5 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan London area was 40 years, compared with 38.6 years in 2006. 

Back to top 

St. Catharines-Niagara

Senior citizens now represent 19.2 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of St. Catharines — Niagara, a ratio higher than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 75,130 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of St. Catharines — Niagara were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 19.2 per cent of the population compares to a national average of 14.8 and a provincial average of 14.6 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 17.7 per cent of the metropolitan population of St. Catharines — Niagara were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of St.Catharines — Niagara — those 14 and under — has decreased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 15.2 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 17 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the St. Catharines — Niagara region — people aged 15 to 64 — represent 65.7 per cent of the area’s residents. That's the same as the 2006 census when 65.7 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan St. Catharines — Niagara area was 44.4 years, compared with 42.1 years in 2006. 

Back to top 

Kingston

Senior citizens now represent 16.3 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of Kingston, a ratio higher than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 25,975 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of Kingston were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 16.3 per cent of the population compares to a national average of 14.8 and a provincial average of 14.6 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 15.3 per cent of the metropolitan population of Kingston were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of Kingston — those 14 and under — has decreased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 15 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 17 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the Kingston region — people aged 15 to 64 — represent 68.8 per cent of the area's residents. That’s up from the 2006 census when 68.5 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan Kingston area was 41.4 years, compared with 40.7 years in 2006.

Back to top 

Ottawa-Gatineau

Senior citizens now represent 12.7 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of Ottawa — Gatineau, a ratio lower than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 156,880 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of Ottawa — Gatineau were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 12.7 per cent of the population compares to a national average of 14.8 and a provincial average of 14.6 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 11.7 per cent of the metropolitan population of Ottawa — Gatineau were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of Ottawa — Gatineau — those 14 and under — has increased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 17.1 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 17 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the Ottawa — Gatineau region — people aged 15 to 64 — represent 70.2 per cent of the area's residents. That’s down from the 2006 census when 70.4 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan Ottawa — Gatineau area was 39.1 years, compared with 38.4 years in 2006.

Back to top 

Windsor

Senior citizens now represent 14.9 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of Windsor, a ratio about the same as the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 47,590 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of Windsor were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 14.9 per cent of the population compares to a national average of14.8 and a provincial average of 14.6 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 13 per cent of the metropolitan population of Windsor were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of Windsor — those 14 and under — has decreased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 17.6 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 17 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the Windsor region — people aged 15 to 64 — represent 67.5 per cent of the area's residents. That’s down from the 2006 census when 68 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan Windsor area was 40.6 years, compared with 37.7 years in 2006. 

Back to top 

Greater Sudbury/Grand Sudbury

Senior citizens now represent 16.1 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of Greater Sudbury / Grand Sudbury, a ratio higher than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 25,835 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of Greater Sudbury / Grand Sudbury were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 16.1 per cent of the population compares to a national average of 14.8 and a provincial average of14.6 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 14.9 per cent of the metropolitan population of Greater Sudbury / Grand Sudbury were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of Greater Sudbury / Grand Sudbury — those 14 and under — has decreased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 15.6 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 17 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the Greater Sudbury / Grand Sudbury region — people aged 15 to 64 — represent 68.3 per cent of the area’s residents. That's the same as the 2006 census when 68.3 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan Greater Sudbury / Grand Sudbury area was 42.3 years, compared with 41 years in 2006.

Back to top 

Thunder Bay

Senior citizens now represent 17.2 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of Thunder Bay, a ratio higher than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 20,885 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of Thunder Bay were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 17.2 per cent of the population compares to a national average of 14.8 and a provincial average of 14.6 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 16 per cent of the metropolitan population of Thunder Bay were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of Thunder Bay — those 14 and under — has decreased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 14.8 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 17 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the Thunder Bay region — people aged 15 to 64 — represent 68 per cent of the area's residents. That’s up from the 2006 census when 67.5 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan Thunder Bay area was 43.6years, compared with 41.8 years in 2006. 

Back to top 

Winnipeg

Senior citizens now represent 14.1 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of Winnipeg, a ratio lower than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 102,855 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of Winnipeg were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 14.1 per cent of the population compares to a national average of 14.8 and a provincial average of 14.3 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 13.8 per cent of the metropolitan population of Winnipeg were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of Winnipeg — those 14 and under — has increased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 17.1 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 19.1 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the Winnipeg region — people aged 15 to 64 — represent 68.8 per cent of the area's residents. That’s up from the 2006 census when 68.4 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan Winnipeg area was 39.2 years, compared with 38.8 years in 2006. 

Nationally, the median age in 2011 was 40.6 years and the provincial median age was 38.4 years. 

Back to top 

Regina

Senior citizens now represent 13.1 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of Regina, a ratio lower than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 27,620 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of Regina were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 13.1 per cent of the population compares to a national average of14.8 and a provincial average of 14.9 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 13.2 per cent of the metropolitan population of Regina were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of Regina — those 14 and under — has increased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 17.6 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 19.1 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the Regina region — people aged 15 to 64 — represent 69.2 per cent of the area's residents. That’s up from the 2006 census when 68.9 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan Regina area was 37.3 years, compared with 37.5 years in 2006. 

Back to top 

Saskatoon

Senior citizens now represent 12.1 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of Saskatoon, a ratio lower than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 31,585 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of Saskatoon were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 12.1 per cent of the population compares to a national average of 14.8 and a provincial average of 14.9 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 12.4 per cent of the metropolitan population of Saskatoon were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of Saskatoon — those 14 and under — has increased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 17.9 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 19.1 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the Saskatoon region — people aged 15 to 64 — represent 70 per cent of the area's residents. That’s up from the 2006 census when 69.1 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan Saskatoon area was 35.4 years, compared with 35.8 years in 2006. 

Back to top 

Calgary

Senior citizens now represent 9.8 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of Calgary, a ratio lower than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 118,740 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of Calgary were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 9.8 per cent of the population compares to a national average of14.8 and a provincial average of 11.1 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 9.4 per cent of the metropolitan population of Calgary were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of Calgary — those 14 and under — has increased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 18.3 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 18.8 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the Calgary region — people aged 15 to 64 — represent 71.9 per cent of the area's residents. That’s down from the 2006 census when 72.2 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan Calgary area was 36.4 years, compared with 35.7 years in 2006. 

Back to top 

Edmonton

Senior citizens now represent 11.4 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of Edmonton, a ratio lower than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 132,245 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of Edmonton were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 11.4 per cent of the population compares to a national average of 14.8 and a provincial average of 11.1 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 11.1 per cent of the metropolitan population of Edmonton were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of Edmonton — those 14 and under — has increased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 17.7 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 18.8 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the Edmonton region — people aged 15 to 64 — represent 70.9 per cent of the area's residents. That’s about the same as the 2006 census when 70.8 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan Edmonton area was 36.5 years, compared with 36.4 years in 2006. 

Back to top 

Vancouver

Senior citizens now represent 13.5 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of Vancouver, a ratio lower than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 312,900 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of Vancouver were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 13.5 per cent of the population compares to a national average of 14.8 and a provincial average of 15.7 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 12.8 per cent of the metropolitan population of Vancouver were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of Vancouver — those 14 and under — has increased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 15.3 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 15.4 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the Vancouver region — people aged 15 to 64 — represent 71.2 per cent of the area's residents. That’s up from the 2006 census when 70.8 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan Vancouver area was 40.2 years, compared with 39.1 years in 2006. 

Back to top 

Victoria

Senior citizens now represent 18.4 per cent of the population of the metropolitan area of Victoria, a ratio higher than the national average, the latest census numbers from Statistics Canada show. 

Newly released census information on age and sex makes it clear that Canadian society is getting older. The data released Tuesday comes from census forms filled out May 10, 2011 — a moment in time when the first of the baby boom generation was turning 65. 

The census showed that 63,440 people in what's known as the census metropolitan area of Victoria were aged 65 or older. The ratio of 18.4 per cent of the population compares to a national average of 14.8 and a provincial average of 15.7 per cent. 

Five years ago, the 2006 census showed that 17.8 per cent of the metropolitan population of Victoria were seniors. 

The number of children in the metropolitan region of Victoria — those 14 and under — has decreased since the last census. 

The new data shows that children make up 13.1 per cent of the population. Across Canada, children represent 16.8 per cent of the population and the provincial average is 15.4 per cent. 

Those of working-age population in the Victoria region — people aged 15 to 64 — represent 68.5 per cent of the area's residents. That's up from the 2006 census when 68.1 per cent of the population was made up of working-age residents. 

The median age of the metropolitan Victoria area was 44.2 years, compared with 43.1 years in 2006.

Back to top