A by-the-numbers look at some of the latest information from the 2011 census, released Tuesday by Statistics Canada:

3,795: The number of people in Canada aged 100 and older in 2001.

5,825: The number of people in Canada aged 100 and older in 2011.

78,300: The number of people in Canada aged 100 and older in the year 2061, according to Statistics Canada projections.

4,945,060: The number of people in Canada aged 65 or older, 14.1 per cent more than in 2006.

5,607,345: The number of children in Canada aged 14 and under, 0.5 per cent more than in 2006.

2016: The year Statistics Canada projects children under 14 will, for the first time, be outnumbered by seniors.

4,393,305: The number of people in Canada aged 55 to 64 in 2011.

4,365,585: The number of people in Canada aged 15 to 24 in 2011.

0.99: Ratio of people aged 15-24 to people aged 55-64 in 2011.

2.95: Ratio of people aged 15-24 to people aged 55-64 in 1931.

29.1 per cent: The rate at which the number of people aged 60-64 grew between 2006 and 2011.

3: Fertility rate in Nunavut.

0.5: Decline, in percentage points, in the proportion of seniors in Saskatchewan between 2006 and 2011, the result of an increase in the number of people under the age of 65.

20.9: Percentage increase in the number of children aged four and under in Alberta between 2006 and 2011.

1.9: Percentage increase in the number of children aged four and under in the Northwest Territories between 2006 and 2011.

40.6: In years, Canada's median age in 2011 -- the age at which one half the population is older and the other half is younger. In 2006, it was 39.5.