Canada supports two-state solution, Stephen Harper tells Benjamin Netanyahu

Prime Minister Stephen Harper has reiterated Canada's support for a two-state solution for Israelis and Palestinians during a phone call to newly re-elected Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

First time two leaders spoken since Israeli PM secured an election victory with hardline stance

Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu talk in Jerusalem in January 2014. In a phone call with the re-elected Netanyahu, Harper reiterated Canada's support for a two-state solution for Palestinians and Israelis after Netanyahu made a hardline stance. (Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press)

Prime Minister Stephen Harper has reiterated Canada's support for a two-state solution for Israelis and Palestinians during a phone call to newly re-elected Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

It was the first time the two leaders had spoken since Netanyahu secured a victory on Tuesday. 

In the final days of the hotly contested campaign, Netanyahu said he would not support the creation of an independent Palestinian state — a position that flies in the face of that taken by the U.S., Europe and Canada.

A statement from the prime minister's office said that Harper had reiterated the government's resolute commitment to Israel's security, and also Canada's long-standing position in favour of a two-state solution.

Harper's more low-key approach has contrasted with that of U.S. President Barack Obama, who has expressed his disappointment with Netanyahu's comments.

Obama told the Huffington Post that Netanyahu's election rhetoric runs contrary to Israel's traditional commitment to democracy and equality, and could also give ammunition to the country's enemies.

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