Fight for equality is far from over, protesters at Calgary Women's March say

One year after the Women's March on Washington, thousands of Calgarians pulled out their protest signs and pink tuques to join communities around the world in demanding gender equality.

Thousands of people took to Stephen Avenue for second-annual Women's March

March organizer Adora Nwofor speaks at the Calgary Women's March on Jan. 20, 2018. (Rachel Maclean/CBC)

One year after the Women's March on Washington, thousands of Calgarians pulled out their protest signs and pink tuques to join communities around the world in demanding gender equality. 

People of all ages, races and genders filled the streets of downtown Calgary on Saturday in a march that culminated at city hall.

Some protesters were there for the same reason as last year — to protest U.S. President Donald Trump — but others were brought out by the evolving conversation around women's issues that has been brought to the forefront with the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements.

Calgarian Deb Pratt marched with her husband, daughters, granddaughter and grandson — all "ardent feminists" clad in pink "pussyhats" that Pratt knit herself.

Deb Pratt, far right, made pink "pussyhats" for her husband, daughters and grandchildren to wear to the Women's March. (Anis Heydari/CBC)

"My daughters and I have all endured harassment," Pratt said.

"Those stories need to be told."

She said one thing that has changed since last year's march is that more women are opening up about their experiences with sexual harassment and abuse.

"If we keep telling our stories and we keep horrifying the men in our lives with the things we have endured just because we dare to walk out in our female bodies, that's what will change it," Pratt said.

Thousands of Calgarians attended the second Women's March on Jan. 20, 2018. (Rachel Maclean/CBC)

Mecoh Dixon attended the march for the first time this year, and brought her two-year-old daughter along to show her "that she has a voice, and she's worthy."

Dixon said attending the march was "out of [her] comfort zone," but she's glad she went for her daughter's sake.

"I just wanted her to see how far we've come and how far we've been able to go," she said. 

Mecoh Dixon brought her two-year-old daughter to the march. (Anis Heydari/CBC)

Protestors listened to speeches from several speakers — most of which shared a message about how the battle for equality is far from finished.

Carole Carpot, an employee at the Calgary Women's Centre, said there's a long road ahead.

"The fight is not over," she said. "And there's still a lot to be done in terms of gender equity."

With files from Anis Heydari