Seven regions in southern Alberta were placed under wind chill warnings from Environment Canada over the weekend.

The warnings, which come as a cold Arctic air mass moves through the eastern part of the province, advised residents to monitor conditions as temperatures reach -40 C to -45 C.

While most of the warnings ended Sunday, there is still a wind warning in effect for Crowsnest Pass, Pincher Creek and Waterton. The area could see wind gusts up to 100 km/h.

However, temperatures should reach above zero for other parts of the province Monday and stay pretty steady for the week.

"We should have mild temperatures that are a degree or [two] above average for the week," said CBC Calgary's weather specialist Jodi Hughes. 

  • What does the cold weather look like where you live? Send in your photos to calgaryphotos@cbc.ca or tweet @CBCCalgary.

Those hoping to taking advantage of wintry weather by hitting a city ski hill Sunday were out of luck.

Canada Olympic Park announced it closed the ski and snowboard runs until noon due to high wind chills, which made it feel like -31 C around the city. 

Alberta isn't the only province affected by the cold.

Most of the Prairies and U.S. Midwest are struggling to cope with a deep freeze as a polar vortex works its way down from the Arctic.

Ontario and the Maritimes are also working to recover after an ice storm that knocked down thousands of trees and left many residents without power.

In Newfoundland, many areas of the province are still without power and could be until Tuesday.