U of C seeks feedback on plan that will guide campus development for 30 years

If you've ever walked along a pathway on the University of Calgary campus and slowly come to the realization you have no idea where it's taking you, help could be around the corner. Not in a literal sense though.

University is seeking public input into it's long-range vision for the 'small city'

University architect Jane Ferrabee, says the long range development plan will guide campus construction for the next 30 years once approved. (CBC)

If you've ever walked along a pathway on the University of Calgary campus and slowly come to the realization you have no idea where it's taking you, help could be around the corner. Not in a literal sense though. 

The university is drafting a long-range development plan that will help it figure out where to put future buildings and greenspaces and how to build a more logical system of pathways for pedestrians and cyclists.

"This isn't really about build out, this is about anticipating, setting a framework in place so that when build out occurs, some of the decisions have been made about where buildings can go," said university architect Jane Ferrabee.

The U of C is hosting open houses in order to get community feedback on the plan, which will then go to management and finally end up on the desk of the minister of advanced education for approval.

Ferrabee, speaking at the first open house on Feb. 9, says the plan will guide development on the campus for the next 30 years and that getting feedback from students, faculty and surrounding residents is important. 

"Campus is a community. It's a small city and it makes a lot of people's memories," she said. 

She says the final draft of the plan could be on the minister's desk by the new year. 

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