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Last winter, the city received 6,533 complaints about unshovelled walks. ((CBC))

Calgary's first major snowfall this season has prompted the city to remind people to keep their walks clear of snow and ice.

Bylaws require property owners to clear all sidewalks adjacent to their homes or businesses — down to the bare concrete — within 24 hours after it stops snowing.

"Sidewalks that are not cleared can result in serious falls and injuries for those who use them and cause citizens with limited mobility to be confined indoors," said Jim Golbourn, manager of south operations for animal and bylaw services.

If a complaint is called in to the city's 311 phone line, a bylaw officer will visit the residence and issue a warning notice. If no action is taken, a city-contracted crew will clear the walk and the property owner will be billed.

Last winter, 311 received 6,533 complaints about unshovelled walks.

Calgary had about 14 centimetres of snow by Sunday evening, and Environment Canada was forecasting another five to 10 centimetres by Monday morning.

More than 200 collisions reported in 24 hours

Emergency officials responding to Sunday's snowfall advised motorists to stay home "unless absolutely necessary."

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The city said 70 sanders and 24 graders worked to keep roads clear on Sunday night. ((CBC))

The city dispatched 75 sanders and nine loaders on Sunday morning to clear major roads, and reported that 70 sanders and 24 graders were working on Sunday night to pave the way for Monday's commute.

By the morning, most major roads were wet and slushy, but some side streets still had icy patches.

Police responded to 232 collisions from 9 a.m. Sunday to 9 a.m. Monday. Twenty-eight involved minor injuries, they said.

Calgary paramedics, who usually answer one or two vehicle-collision calls on a regular Sunday, said they responded to about 30 crashes in four hours.

Calgary Emergency Medical Services went into a red alert, meaning no transport ambulances are available in the city, for about five minutes just before 1 p.m., reported EMS spokesman Paul Lapointe.