Shovel your neighbour's snow, Mayor Nenshi suggests

As the city digs out from this week’s blizzard, the mayor is asking Calgarians to consider lending a hand to seniors and people with disabilities

Snow Angel program entering its 10th season

Mayor Naheed Nenshi encouraged Calgarians to shovel their neighbour's sidewalks after the blizzard that hit the city Monday. (Katy Anderson/CBC)

As the city digs out from this week’s blizzard, the mayor is asking Calgarians to consider lending a hand to seniors and people with disabilities.

Naheed Nenshi launched the 10th annual Snow Angels program Wednesday.

“Be an angel, if you’re out there anyway it’s marginal extra work to do someone else’s but it can make a huge difference not only for your neighbour but for the people who need to use that sidewalk every day,” he said.

The program encourages residents to offer to help people in their neighbourhood clear snow from their sidewalks and driveways.

“Keeping sidewalks shovelled, ice-free and safe can be very challenging — even dangerous — for older adults and others who have limited mobility,” the city says on its website.

People whose walks have been adopted by a neighbour are encouraged to call 311 to get their snow angels officially recognized by the city. 

“For such a simple program of neighbours helping neighbours, it’s wonderful to see how it’s grown over the past 10 years,” says Snow Angels program co-ordinator John Mungham in a release. “When you’re out clearing your walks this winter, spend an extra few minutes and help out someone on your street. It’s not hard, but it does make a real difference.”

Since 2004, the campaign has recognized 6,403 snow angels.

Ray Alfred says he used to volunteer, but now receives help from the program.

"Because Snow Angels help me with my walks, it has meant that I’m able to remain independent and living in my own home,” he said in a release.

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