Shawn Everett wins Grammy for best engineered album

A sound engineer from Bragg Creek won his first Grammy last night at the 58th annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles.

'It felt like a really great version of a panic attack,' says Banff Centre alumnus

Shawn Everett delivers an acceptance speech after winning a Grammy Award for the Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical at the 58th annual ceremony in Los Angeles on Monday. (The Grammys/YouTube)

A sound engineer from Bragg Creek won his first Grammy last night at the 58th annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles.

Shawn Everett took home the trophy in the category Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical for his work with American rock band Alabama Shakes on their album Sound and Color, which also won a Grammy for Best Alternative Album. 

"It felt like a really great version of a panic attack," Everett told CBC News.

"It was so shocking to hear your name," added Everett, who likened the experience to "an all-dressed chip of emotions."

"A big highlight was just having my parents there. It was so cool that they got to do this with me."

The Banff Centre alumnus even took his parents to the Alabama Shakes after party.

"They got to meet the band and everything, and we just kind of hang out and drank a little too much," he joked.

Despite receiving one of highest honours in the music industry, not much has changed for Everett in the day to day.

"I'm already knee deep in all these other projects," said Everett, who estimates he's now concurrently working on six or seven different albums.

"Pretty much start up again tomorrow and just keep working on the same albums I was working on. There's always a ton going on. Just keep going at it."

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