Alberta's Progressive Conservative (PC) Party has another candidate to consider as it prepares for a leadership race. 

"My name is Ric McIver and I am running for PC leader," the Calgary MLA told reporters Wednesday morning.

The first-term MLA resigned as infrastructure minister Tuesday ahead of the announcement.

Even though he has been a cabinet minister for the past two years, where he also served as transportation minister, McIver says his government has lost its way and desperately needs new thinking.

He says politics is about getting things done for the people of Alberta, and that is why he is entering the race to replace Alison Redford.

McIver, who has a political track record as a fiscal conservative, says — if he wins — his chief of staff will never make more money than him.

"The chief of staff salary is set significantly higher than the premier's salary," he said. "This makes no sense."

He is also promising that the senior people on his campaign team would not be eligible for future government jobs, and anyone who lobbies the government will not be allowed to get government work.

"Companies and individuals will have to pick sides," he said. "You either work for the government from the inside, or you work to influence the government from the outside."

Voters are the bosses, says MLA

McIver says he has ideas which don't come from MLAs or political insiders, they come from his bosses — the voters.

He points to the government's deal with the Tsuu T'ina Nation on the southwest Calgary ring road as a political achievement.

McIver says politics is about getting things done for Albertans, and not about fancy planes or getting rich.

Redford had been in hot water before stepping down as premier for her flight expenses. CBC News reported Redford had flown her daughter on government planes dozens of times, including two long weekends in Jasper in which there is no record of the former premier conducting any government work.

The only other candidate so far is Calgary MLA Ken Hughes, although a source close to former MP Jim Prentice told CBC News he will be joining the race soon.

The Alberta PC party has unanimously approved the use of electronic voting options such as online and mobile phones to select its next leaders.

The election committee says it wants to enable as many Albertans as possible to be part of the process to select the new leader.

The leadership convention will be held in September.