Red Deer e-cigarettes users annoyed by 'vaping' ban

Red Deer city council has banned the use of electronic cigarettes in public venues and that annoys some users of the new product.

Alberta city counts the technology under their local smoking bylaw

The city of Red Deer said last month that residents will no longer be able to vape e-cigarettes wherever they please after it determined an existing local bylaw's definition of smoking applied to vaping as well. (Ron Medvescek/Arizona Daily Star/Associated Press)

Red Deer city council has banned the use of electronic cigarettes in public venues and that annoys some users of the new product.

"It's absolutely ridiculous. They're completely not cigarettes,” says Takara Grant.

The 20-year-old says she smoked two to three packs of cigarettes a day before she discovered "vaping,” which is what many users call the practice

She says Red Deer council is behind the times.

Unlike tobacco — which contains noxious chemicals — e-cigarettes produce a vapour that is composed mostly of water and nicotine.

Jeff Wingert, a newcomer to the world of vaping says he can understand councils' move to restrict their use.

"People may be uncomfortable seeing someone vaporizing in public in a restaurant or in front of children so I can understand why it happened,” says Wingert.

“I see the other side, too, where people should be able to enjoy something that doesn't harm others.”

Natasha Ford, who  works at Vapor Hub in Red Deer, says business is good despite the restrictions imposed by Red Deer council.

She says customers use e-cigarettes to quit tobacco but most want to cut out nicotine entirely.

"The ultimate goal is to go from whatever you start out at, to zero grams of nicotine,” said Ford.

Health Canada, however, advises Canadians not to "vape" because their safety has not been proven.

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