Maple Match links Canadians looking for love with single Americans fleeing Trump

Maple Match links Canadians who are looking for love with single Americans looking to get out.

Fear of a Trump presidency has spawned a dating site that hooks up Yankees and Canucks

"Absolutely this is serious!" said Joe Goldman, CEO and founder of the website MapleMatch.com (Shutterstock)

Ever since Donald Trump announced he would run for the Republican Party leadership, Americans have been googling "how to move to Canada."

Now, there's a new website that helps them do just that — if they're single.

Wait. Is this for real?

"Absolutely this is serious! The 49th parallel is just a line and Americans and Canadians have so much in common," Joe Goldman, CEO of MapleMatch.com told the Calgary Eyeopener in a phone interview from  Austin, Tx. on Tuesday.

But is this Goldman guy really the cupid of cross-border love, or is he just servicing the interests of Americans who are scared of the prospect of a Donald Trump presidency? 

"A lot of Americans are quite uneasy, that's certainly a fact, and that's one of the reasons why I thought now would be the right time to launch Maple Match," said Goldman.

 

Idea came from Calgary

Goldman said he came up with the idea because of the "current political situation in the United States" and some old Calgary acquaintances.

"Fun fact. I can give 100 per cent of the responsibility to Calgary, Canada. Because I grew up with family friends from Calgary and they taught me a lot about Canada and Canadian culture."

Website wait list growing

While there has yet to be a cheesy commercial made re-enacting a Yankee's first bite into a Timbit whilst gazing into eyes of his newfound Canuck darling, people on both sides of the border are already showing interest in the service.

As of Tuesday morning, Goldman said more than 10,000 singles and about 2,500 Canadians had signed up for the website's wait list.


With files from the Calgary Eyeopener

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