In the Internet age, April Fool's Day is a chance for companies and organizations to show off their silly side with tongue-in-cheek videos, photos, websites and product launches.

Local pranksters pulled out their best tricks in honour of the day, like Calgary-based airline WestJet.

According to WestJet's promotional "Furry Family" video, pets now allowed on board include raccoons, goats and bears.

"We wanted to take the furry friends approach and play around a little bit with the fact that our guests are now able to have small animals in the cabin," said WestJet spokesperson Brie Ogle.

Passengers like Vesna Martin say there's nothing wrong with a bit of monkey business on April Fool's Day.

"I think certain traditions should never go away, and I think this is one of them," she said.

WestJet has a history of pulling pranks, but they weren't the only ones having fun today.

Sasquatch photo taken by Parks Canada

Parks Canada sent out a photo claiming it had discovered a new species on its wildlife overpass near Lake Louise, Alta. — a homo borealis, commonly known as Sasquatch or yeti.


Parks Canada released a photo of a "new species" caught on the wildlife overpass near Lake Louise, Alta. (Courtesy of Parks Canada)

"Yeti and Banff National Park are both icons of the Canadian wilderness experience, so we're very pleased with this observation," said Melanie Kwong, superintendent responsible for the Lake Louise area of Banff National Park in a release. "And I'm pretty sure this discovery is a world's first — not even Yellowstone can say they've had a sighting like this!"

Some of the best pranks have come from Canadians, including photos of a UFO posted by International Space Station Commander Chris Hadfield.

There was a tweet from Bob Rae announcing he has decided to run for the federal Liberal leadership after all.

Twitter also announced it would be shifting to a two-tiered service: the consonant-only Twitter service available to everyone or the premium service that includes vowels for $5 a month.

The micro-blogging website joked that by discouraging vowels, Twitter would encourage a more efficient and "dense" form of communication.