Jim Prentice resignation as MLA too fast, strategist says

One political strategist is questioning Prentice's decision to not only quit the leadership of the Alberta Tories, but also walk away from his newly elected seat in Calgary- Foothills.

'I've never seen someone walk away from the seat that they were just elected into,' says Stephen Carter

Alberta PC leader Jim Prentice speaks on stage following his party's stunning election loss on Tuesday, telling the crowd he is stepping down as leader and that he will not take the seat he just won in Calgary. (The Canadian Press/Jeff McIntosh)

One political strategist is questioning Jim Prentice's decision to not only quit the leadership of the Progressive Conservative party but also walk away from his newly elected seat in Calgary-Foothills.

"My contribution to public life is now at an end," Prentice told supporters Tuesday night in the wake of his party's decisive loss to Rachel Notley's NDP.

Stephen Carter, who ran the campaigns for both Mayor Naheed Nenshi and former PC Premier Allison Redford, says the outgoing premier is doing a disservice to the people who voted for him.

"I've never seen someone walk away from the seat that they were just elected in to," he said. "And the people that voted for him, the thousands of people who voted for him, have some questions that are going to need to be answered."

Carter says Prentice is abdicating his responsibility to the electorate by walking away so swiftly.

"When you put your name on the ballot, you don't put your name on the ballot in good times only," he said. "It is something that you have to stand up and you say, 'I'm going to serve the people of the province of Alberta, people of Calgary-Foothills, because it's the right thing to do, not just because I get to be the premier.'"

Prentice took some jabs for his quick exit on social media, as well. 

Carter predicts that the PC party in Alberta will likely now quickly fall apart, as the members of the vastly reduced caucus come to realize the only values they had in common hinged on remaining in power.

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