Flood-damaged parks to get $81M fix-up from province

The Alberta government is spending $81 million to restore provincial parks damaged by floodwaters in June.

Majority of the money will be spent restoring Kananaskis Country

Alberta is spending $81 million to restore provincial parks damaged by floodwaters in June. 1:50

The Alberta government is spending $81 million to restore provincial parks damaged by floodwaters in June.

About 170 kilometres of pathways and recreation trails were wiped out in the disaster, while 50 campgrounds and 60 day-use areas were damaged.

The majority of the funding announced on Wednesday — $60 million — will pay for restoration work in Kananaskis Country.

About $16 million will be spent fixing Calgary’s Fish Creek Provincial Park, where every bridge will need some degree of repair, including four crossings that were seriously compromised.

Recreational areas west of Calgary were devastated when floodwaters ripped through the area in June. (Mark Matulis/CBC)

The rest will go towards projects in Wyndham-Carseland Provincial Park southeast of Calgary and the Oldman Dam Provincial Recreation Area near Pincher Creek.

Richard Starke, the provincial minister of tourism, parks and recreation, said the money is crucial to restore the pathways, bridges and campsites.

"We will be able to offer Albertans and our visitors from around the world the chance to enjoy our incredible landscapes once again,” he said.

Parks' staff and thousands of volunteers have already begun restoring some areas. Major work will begin next year, the province said.

  • Click on the video below for a look at flood damage in Fish Creek Provincial Park.

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