A group of parents plans to step up its lobby campaign to keep the arts in Alberta schools.

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Dozens of parents got together at William Aberhart High School on Monday night for a Save Our Fine Arts (SOFA) meeting. (Neil Herland/CBC)

Dozens of parents got together at William Aberhart High School on Monday night for a Save Our Fine Arts (SOFA) meeting.

The province is in the process of re-writing the curriculum for 2016 and the group is worried that drama, art and music programs will get short shrift.  

"Curriculums are re-written typically every 20 to 25 years, so if we don't get it right this time we may not like what we have for the next 25 years,” said SOFA co-chair Lyle Bennett.

A quintet of teenage jazz musicians played for the group while it met in the school gymnasium.

Nicole Tse, a Grade 11 student and tenor saxophone player, said music opens people up.

"And that allows you to express your ideas and just be more out there and be a leader more than a follower,” she said.

Tara Klager, mother of bass player Caleb Klager, said her son demanded a ukulele instead of a hockey stick when he was in Grade 4..

"So for kids who aren't sporty, who sports don't motivate them, music and the arts generally give them a place to call home,” she said.

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Saxophone player Stefan Haynes says the arts can be inspiring in ways that core academic subjects sometimes aren't. (CBC)

Arts should be incorporated into everyone’s learning, the budding musician said.

“I find it’s just as important as math or science or social studies,” Klager said.

Saxophone player Stefan Haynes agreed. “The arts give inspiration in a way that math and science don’t.”

Members of SOFA plan to launch a social media campaign and recruit professional arts groups to help lobby the province.