'Significant dial-a-dope' bust nets $18K worth of fentanyl, $23K in cash

Police say they've seized more than 600 fentanyl pills, nearly $23,000 in cash and two sets of body armour from a man they allege was participating in a "significant dial-a-dope operation" in Calgary.

Drug activity linked to 'much of the violence being seen in Calgary in the last year,' police say

Fentanyl pills are intended for severe pain but are often abused and sold as a street drug for their heroin-like effects. Police warn the drug can be extremely deadly if the dosage is off by even a tiny amount and note there were hundreds of fentanyl-related deaths in Alberta last year alone. (Canadian Press)

Police say they've seized more than 600 fentanyl pills, nearly $23,000 in cash and two sets of body armour from a man they allege was participating in a "significant dial-a-dope operation" in Calgary.

The suspect, a 34-year-old Calgary man, was arrested on Jan. 20 and officers found 606 fentanyl pills, worth an estimated $18,000, in his car along with some methadone and cash.

More drugs and cash were later found in a search of the man's home in the 100 block of Taradale Close N.E.

Police also seized two sets of body armour, bear spray, and ammunition from the residence.

The man faces numerous drug-related criminal offences along with charges under the provincial Body Armour Control Act.

The term "dial-a-dope" refers to an illegal drug-delivery service, where dealers bring the narcotics directly to customers, rather than having the customers come to them.

"This drug activity is believed to be at the core of much of the violence being seen in Calgary in the last year," police said in a release.

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