Free book offers tips to survive and thrive after losing your job

A new, free book being offered by Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada hopes to answer a question looming for tens of thousands of out-of-work Albertans: what do I do next?

From how to use a tax free savings account, to debt management strategies, leveraging lines of credit

A man reads a copy of Survive and Thrive: Move Ahead Financially After Losing Your Job at a launch Tuesday. The book is being offered, free, by Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada. (Evelyne Asselin/CBC)

A new, free book being offered by Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada hopes to answer a question looming for tens of thousands of out-of-work Albertans: what do I do next?

Survive and Thrive: Move Ahead Financially After Losing Your Job is available for download and aimed at helping people who have lost their jobs move on in the most positive way possible.

Dealing with the emotional toll, said the book's author, David Trahair, is as important as the hard numbers.

"Most people assume it's just going to be about the numbers, about the money, and that is in there," he said.

"But that's really secondary to getting back on track and trying to maintain your mental health and get out there and motivate yourself."

Created in conjunction with the Calgary Public Library, the 108-page book covers everything from how to use a tax free savings account, to debt management strategies, leveraging lines of credit, submitting a consumer proposal and if needed, filing for bankruptcy.

Author David Trahair says dealing with the emotions of losing a job is as important as keeping track of numbers. (Evelyne Asselin/CBC)

"I'm trying to give them hope, inspire them not to give up because giving up is the worst thing you can do," said Trahair.

"We talk about various different strategies and to be honest, it might involve moving somewhere else to find a job. We get into possibly becoming self-employed or consulting, hopefully throw out some ideas that will motivate them to keep going and keep trying."

Too many Canadians, both employed and unemployed, are carrying too much debt, said Trahair.

"Many Canadians are spending more than they make, even in a good economy, so they're woefully unprepared for something like a job loss," he said.

"And it ends up being a vicious, downward spiral."

Stacey Miller was laid off from her job at a bank after 24 years. (Evelyne Asselin/CBC)

After 24 years at a bank, Stacey Miller's position was eliminated.

"I'm just looking at different options of what to do," she said.

"I'm wanting to just figure a way through this. Just a way to navigate into a different type of career... I want to change more into the creative side."

Copies of the book were also handed out at a seminar Tuesday held at the Calgary Public Library.

With files from Evelyne Asselin