CBC commissioned EKOS to survey how Canadians feel about a variety of topics making headlines these days — including pipelines.

This week we break down the numbers. 

A country conflicted

Canadians appear torn between a rising environmental ethic and deep anxieties about the economy. We talk with oil workers in Alberta, Manitobans and Quebecers along the Energy East pipeline route to give context to the discussion.

Justin and Leanne Mills

Justin and Leanne Mills talk about the impact of Alberta's economic downturn with CBC. (Colin Hall/CBC)

Support for Alberta

The poll showed strong support for hard hit Alberta among many Canadians right now, but it's not universal. We ask if some Canadians are enjoying Alberta's pain right now.

Engebretsen

The Engebretsen family of Lloydminster, Alta., keeps smiling despite enduring a tough year and a half since the price of oil began to plummet. (Colin Hall/CBC)

Can we have it both?

When it comes to taking care of the planet and taking care of our family, do we really have to pick one over the other? 

The economy, the environment, or both? How Canadian attitudes are shifting3:39

Pipelines

Energy East has the broadest support of any pipeline project in Canada, but there are significant differences in pipeline support in different provinces in the country. Our survey identifies where support is strongest and weakest.

Marcellin Bélanger

Marcellin Bélanger spoke to CBC from his family's maple tree farm in L'Islet, Quebec. (Bernard Huard/Radio-Canada)

NEB support

Do Canadians trust the National Energy Board? We take a look at what Canadians think about the federal agency responsible for building a sustainable energy future in the country.

Trans Mountain Pipeline 20160119

A man holds a sign while marching to a protest outside National Energy Board hearings on the proposed Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in Burnaby, B.C. (Canadian Press)

Our green energy future

The world will get off oil eventually, but whether that happens in 2030, 2050 or 2070 obviously matters a great deal — especially to a resource-dependent economies such as Canada. We look at how perceptions about the future prospects for the global oil economy may affect energy infrastructure decisions being made today.

Japan Tokyo Motor Show

Before the world can kick its oil addiction, it will need to change the way it drives. (Shizuo Kambayashi/AP)

The age gap

The survey data suggests a split between younger Canadians and mature Canadians when it comes to energy, the environment and the economy. We take a closer look at this divide — and what it could mean.

Three women discuss Canada's oil and gas future

Young Canadians, like Joanna Skrajny, Esther Bogorov and Andrea Johancsik, see a future less dependent on fossil fuels. (Brooks DeCillia)

Interactive

It's no secret that times are tough in Alberta right now. We all feel it — some more than others. But how does the rest of Canada feel? We breakdown the numbers.

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Frank Graves

Frank Graves of the polling firm EKOS says he was surprised by some of the findings. (Vic Modderman/CBC)

See the full poll here: