Calgary Stampede payoff lures professionals from around the world

The Calgary Stampede attracts people from all over the world, but not everyone is looking to relax and take in the sights. Every year hundreds of people take a break from their dayjobs in order to make a huge paycheque serving drinks.

Every year hundreds of people take a break from their dayjobs in order to make a huge paycheque serving drinks

People from all over the world are drawn to the Stampede. (Cowboys Calgary/Facebook)

The Calgary Stampede attracts people from all over the world, but not everyone is looking to relax and take in the sights.

Some professionals — including lawyers, pilots and mortgage brokers — book off time to be bartenders and servers for the possibility of cashing in on the "The Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth."

One of the more popular places around to make some big bucks is at Cowboys Dance Hall. The Stampede tent is located on the grounds just a stumble away from all the action.

  • CBC's Karen Moxley headed down to the Cowboy's tent to see just how much the Stampede staff is pulling in. Click the "Listen" button above to find out.

And there are many — like SholaAdeniyi — who come back here year after year.

"In my other life I'm a WestJet flight attendant. I usually take a couple of weeks off from WestJet, bang it out for two weeks.... and it's actually nice to go back to WestJet to relax." 

Adeniyi declined to say exactly how much he makes as a bartender, but says two years ago he made enough to pay for his wedding during the 10 days he spent working at the Stampede. 

Lauren Zaffino has been a bartender in the Cowboys tent for the last four years.

"My best night would be when I absolutely worked my butt off and I made $2,500," she said.

What's your best paying summer gig? Share your story in the comment section below.

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