Calgary police find 'astronomical' stash of stolen goods, cash

Calgary police have hit the mother lode of stolen goods, finding $1.5 million worth of merchandise and cash in homes and in southeast storage facilities, police said Thursday.

Police calling it ‘one of the largest seizures we have had in the city’

Calgary police have hit the mother lode of stolen goods, finding $1.5 million worth of merchandise in homes and in southeast storage facilities, police said Thursday.

"It is one of the largest seizures that we have had in the City of Calgary as far as stolen property," Calgary police Insp. Nancy Farmer explained.

'It is one of the largest seizures that we have had in the City of Calgary as far as stolen property.' (CBC)

"Stolen property includes things from sporting goods stores, apparel, beauty products new and used, home and industrial appliances, artwork, snow blowers, just a huge amount of property," she said.

A considerable amount of the property was located in various areas in the city including residences as well as several storage facilities within the southeast quadrant of the city. (Calgary Police Services)

A 28-year-old Calgary man has been charged with several counts of possessing stolen property over $5,000 and police say more charges are being considered.

A 28-year-old Calgary man has been charged and more charges are being considered. (Calgary Police Services)

Eight search warrants were executed Jan. 26 which led to merchandise being found in homes.

"It is a significant amount of property, no question," Farmer said.

Some of the merchandise was still boxed, other goods still had retail tags on them. (Calgary Police Services)

"It is astronomical when you start to look at the amount of merchandise that was there."

Police say they are attempting to locate the owners of the stolen goods.

See more of what the police recovered here.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.