Despite being in denial about his sex crimes and displaying a lack of remorse, former court psychiatrist Aubrey Levin was granted day parole and is living in a halfway house.

The Parole Board of Canada granted Levin's release from prison last October, though it denied the 76-year-old his request for full parole. 

The information is contained in a document recently obtained by the CBC.

"You have claimed the victims lied and that the police and the courts 'had it in for you,'" reads part of the Parole Board's decision.

Convicted of sexual assaulting three of his patients between 2008 and 2010, Levin was handed a five-year sentence. But it wasn't until April 2014 when Levin began serving his sentence after the Alberta Court of Appeal denied his bid for a new trial.

All of Levin's victims were facing charges and ordered by the courts to be treated by the psychiatrist.

"You appear to have little concern for your victims," according to part of an assessment considered at the hearing. "You are described as manipulative and present yourself as a victim of the system." 

A psychological assessment prepared for the hearing was just as scathing in its findings, though Levin was deemed to be a low-risk to reoffend.

"You were also noted to deny any sexual motive or basis for your sexual offences."

Levin told the psychologist that he wasn't aware that what he was doing was a criminal act in Canada as it's allowed in his home country of South Africa.

Levin kicked out of religious gatherings

There were two incidents during Levin's time in custody that were of concern to the panel.

During group sessions, Levin was disrespectful to the rabbi, he competed for leadership, was disruptive and got kicked out of the religious gatherings.

One time while waiting for health care staff became concerned when Levin was discussing another inmate's physical ailment based on his previous offences.

But by the time Aubrey Levin gave evidence at his parole hearing in October 2015, he was able to tell the panel he acknowledged that his "overall attitude towards the victims has evolved over time," and that he lacked sympathy at the time of the trial.

Levin also admitted that he inflicted "terrible damage" on his victims.

As part of his release conditions, Levin was ordered to avoid his victims and their families, participate in counselling to address his sexual deviance and not to be in a position of authority.