Notifications

Alberta hires flood mitigation engineering firms

Alberta has hired two engineering companies to help it find ways to protect people from future devastating floods.
Alberta has hired two engineering companies to help find ways to protect people from future devastating floods. Calgary was one of 30 Alberta communities affected by flooding in June. (Jonathan Hayward/Canadian Press)

Alberta has hired two engineering companies to help it find ways to protect people from future devastating floods.

The firms AMEC and AECOM were chosen following a request for proposals by the government.

Details of the contracts, including the cost and when the companies will make their reports, were not released.

Alberta officials have said the projects could include dams, dikes, berms and water diversions.

Officials say the government will ask experts and the public for more ideas at a flood mitigation symposium Friday in Calgary.

The engineering firms would then help the government make a short list of the best ideas and assess their viability.

"We know it is impossible to prevent floods from happening; however there's a lot we can do to lessen the impact these events have on Alberta's communities," Municipal Affairs Minister Doug Griffiths said Tuesday in a release.

"This is a next step in our ongoing work to find the best ways to protect Albertans when floodwaters threaten our homes in the future."

The province estimates more than 100,000 people in 30 communities were affected by the floods. More than 2,000 people are still out of their homes, including almost 1,300 living in temporary neighbourhoods in High River and Siksika.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.