AGLC EnjoyResponsibly campaign aims to curb binge drinking among millennials

The Alberta Gaming and Liquor Commission is trying to dispel the myth among millennials that coolers are less boozy than beer.

Website offers prizes to users who answer trivia based on Canada's Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines

'A drink is a drink,' says AGLC president. 'If you drink a 12-ounce bottle of beer it's the same as drinking a 5-ounce glass of wine or an ounce and half shot. A drink is a drink.' (Shutterstock)

The Alberta Gaming and Liquor Commission is trying to dispel the myth among millennials that coolers are less boozy than beer.

"I think that where we get into some difficulty is the view point that maybe some alcohol products are weaker or not the same as others," said AGLC president Bill Robinson.

"If you drink a 12-ounce bottle of beer it's the same as drinking a 5-ounce glass of wine or an ounce and half shot. A drink is a drink."

The new campaign, called EnjoyResponsibly, is meant to educate young Albertans about what really is the safe number of drinks for men and women based on Canada's Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines.

According to Canada’s Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines, men should consume no more than three drinks per day. (AGLC)

Robinson says the AGLC will do that through its new interactive website which offers users a chance to win tickets to concerts, restaurants and hockey games when they correctly answer a quiz about responsible drinking.

The website is also loaded with facts about the dangers of mixing alcohol with energy drinks and playing drinking games.

An 18-year-old man died after binge drinking during a game of beer pong in Grande Prairie in February.

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