Whistler wins national 'Code of Silence' award

The Canadian Association of Journalists says that since the 2010 Olympics, municipal officials in the resort community have virtually stifled communications with the media.

The annual award recognizes the most secretive government, department or publicly funded agency in Canada

Hugo Rodriguez, president of The Canadian Association of Journalists, and master of ceremonies Evan Solomon present the annual 'Code of Silence' award to the municipality of Whistler Saturday. In 13 years, only one recipient has shown up to accept the CAJ's Code of Silence award. (CBC)

Whistler, B.C., is the winner of this year's Code of Silence Award from the Canadian Association of Journalists.

The annual award meant to highlight Canada's most secretive government or publicly funded agency. It was handed out Saturday night at the CAJ's annual gala in Ottawa.

The association says that since the 2010 Olympics, municipal officials in the resort community have virtually stifled communications with the media.

It says that according to official policy only three people — the mayor, municipal administrator and public information officer — can speak for Whistler.

The association says the control over information exercised in Whistler now rivals that of certain federal departments and PR at the most secretive private corporations.

Other nominees for this year's award included the Library and Archives Canada for its code of conduct that keeps staff members from speaking at conventions, and the muzzling of government scientists by their political masters.

With files from the CBC's Natalie Clancy