What is a temperature inversion?

It is a common occurrence here in Vancouver, and is a term many Vancouverites may know well. But what exactly is a temperature inversion?

Johanna Wagstaffe answers your questions in new weekly video column Science Smart

The temperature increases with height in a layer of atmosphere 2:09

On long stretches of lingering fog or days when the mountains are warmer and sunnier than down at sea level, a temperature inversion is often to blame.

It is a common occurrence here in Vancouver, and is a term many Vancouverites may know well. But what exactly is it?

Johanna Wagstaffe answers that question in this week's Science Smart.

If you have a science question you'd like answered, send Johanna a tweet (@Jwagstaffe) or an email: johanna.wagstaffe@cbc.ca.

About the Author

Johanna Wagstaffe

Senior Meteorologist

Johanna Wagstaffe is a senior meteorologist for CBC, covering weather and science stories, with a background in seismology and earth science. Her weekly segment, Science Smart, answers viewers' science-related questions.

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