Wagstaffe's Weather: Long stretch of sunny and warm for Vancouver

It's the start of something beautiful for Metro Vancouver this week — sunshine and warm temperatures are here to stay for a while.

The last time Metro Vancouver saw more than 3 days of sun in a row was early January

Vancouver will see day after day of sunshine this week, with record-breaking temperatures possible by the end of the week. (Johanna Wagstaffe/CBC)

It's the start of something beautiful for Metro Vancouver this week — sunshine and warm temperatures are here to stay for a while.

Temperatures will be warming up significantly over the next few days as we gain a degree or two each day until parts of Metro Vancouver could hit the 20 degree mark by the end of the week!

Record-breaking heat is possible right across the province. 

If you feel like this stretch of Spring weather has been a long-time coming, you'd be right.

The last time Metro Vancouver saw more than three days in a row of sunshine was Dec 29, 2015 to January 3, 2016.

All week long B.C. will sit under what's known as an 'Omega blocking pattern' where the wind flow in the jet stream resembled the Greek letter — and we get sunny and stagnant weather for days. (Johanna Wagstaffe/CBC)

Blocking pattern traps nice weather

A massive high pressure ridge is building in place over B.C., leading to the sunny and warming conditions over the next six days or so.

The high pressure is being held in place by two lows on either side. That's known as an "Omega blocking pattern" where the wind flow in the jet stream resembles the Greek letter.

It will trap the nice weather, giving the province sunny and stagnant weather for days.

And it looks like we get to keep it until at least Sunday or Monday next week when the ridge is expected to start breaking down. 

Hello sunshine! (Jared Thomas/CBC)

About the Author

Johanna Wagstaffe

Senior Meteorologist

Johanna Wagstaffe is a senior meteorologist for CBC, covering weather and science stories, with a background in seismology and earth science. Her weekly segment, Science Smart, answers viewers' science-related questions.

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