Vancouver mayor at New York CityLab summit

Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson has joined 300 global city leaders at the CityLab conference in New York to discuss economic, cultural and environmental issues.
Gregor Robertson is the only Canadian mayor at the CityLab summit of global city leaders in New York. (The Canadian Press)

Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson has joined 300 global city leaders at the CityLab conference in New York to discuss economic, cultural and environmental issues.

The CityLab summit is hosted by the U.S. magazine The Atlantic, international leadership non-profit The Aspen Institute, and New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's foundation Bloomberg Philanthropies.

The meeting, subtitled Urban Solutions to Global Challenges, will see mayors, city planners and architects discuss economic development, cultural investment and the intersection of public safety, privacy and technology.

Leaders will also take part in a range of panels, including discussion of the environment and sustainability with former U.S. Vice President Al Gore.

Robertson is the only Canadian mayor attending the summit, after being invited by his counterpart in New York.

"Representing Vancouver at CityLab is a great opportunity to both learn from other cities and share the lessons about Vancouver's successes," said Mayor Robertson.

"From economic development to affordable housing to rapid transit, CityLab will provide a unique forum for discussing the biggest challenges we face in Vancouver and cities around the world."

The cost of Mayor Robertson's travel and attendance at the summit are being paid for by CityLab.

All main stage programming and some breakout sessions will be live-streamed online.

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