A doctor for some of Vancouver's high-profile sports teams will be caring for Team Canada at the Winter Olympic Games in Russia.

Dr. Dory Boyer is one of several doctors who will be working at the Olympic Sliding Centre in Sochi, where Canadian athletes will be hurling themselves down an icy track at speeds sometimes in excess of 150 kilometres per hour.

Boyer says he expects most injuries to be minor.

"Really a lot of it is overuse injuries. You know, people are pushing the bobsleds, they have a lot of overuse, strains of their knees, strains of their ankles, upper body things that are going on. It's not as much trauma from impact."

This is not Boyer's first time working with Team Canada. He has also been on the sidelines in Athens, Beijing, Vancouver and the first-ever Youth Olympic Games in Singapore — to name a few.

When he's not travelling the globe, however, he works with some of Vancouver's high-profile sports teams, including the B.C. Lions, the Stealth Lacrosse team, and the Whitecaps.

This experience has taught him that sports medicine is not just about broken bones and torn tendons.

"In any sport when an athlete has an injury, they can certainly have that affect their mental outlook on things. So it's very important to make sure that you're able to help them with what they're going through as well," says Boyer.

Boyer was in Russia last summer for the World University Games and saw success. That's why, despite concerns over preparedness and safety in Sochi this time around, he's ready. 

"The people — the volunteers — banded together and were so spirited at these games, that if Sochi is anything like that, then they're going to be a phenomenal Games," says Boyer.

"There's nothing more exciting than seeing somebody put every drop of their passion, every drop of what they've been doing for the last decades of their life, into one simple action. It's such a thrill."

The opening ceremony for the Winter Olympic Games is on Feb. 7.