After a months-long social media drubbing, the city of Vancouver is keeping its current logo.

The proposed logo, which came with a $8,000 price tag, dropped the flower design and instead used a bold Gotham typeface — a font widely mocked by designers for its ubiquity.

The city said the proposed logo was intentionally made simple to be more inclusive to non-English speakers, and for a simpler roll out on online platforms.

But members of the city's design community were not impressed.

They penned an open letter saying the city had "severely failed to produce an inspirational mark that authentically represents and makes us proud of who we are and can be."

Dan Mansell, who designed the City of Chilliwack's logo, also raised concerns about how similar the new logo was to the one he designed for his city.

chilliwack vancouver logo

The City of Chilliwack logo was commissioned in 2011. Last February, the City of Vancouver proposed a logo with a similar design. (City of Chilliwack/City of Vancouver)

In May 2017, the city put forward a motion to stop the roll out of the proposed redesign and work with the local chapter of the Graphic Designers of Canada on new ideas.

On Thursday, the city said in a statement to CBC it decided not to proceed with the redesign. 

It said it received advice from the design community to proceed only if it was properly resourced and part of a more comprehensive redesign. But since the public said it didn't want the city to spend more money on logo development, its decision was made.

"There was not enough time or money available to do this properly during this council term," the statement said.

In the end, particularly with Wednesday's announcement Mayor Gregor Robertson will not seek re-election, the controversy around the short-lived watermark will probably only live on in this memorable scrum.

Vancouver mayor loses his patience while trying to deflect attention away from city logo mess1:10

At the time, Robertson called reporters' questions about the $8,000 logo "the most absurd line of questioning, I think, I've ever heard in eight years as mayor."