Protesters arrested at Trans Mountain pipeline protest in Burnaby, B.C.

Police officers arrested a group of protesters who they said were violating the terms of an injunction recently granted to Kinder Morgan for its Trans Mountain pipeline work site in Burnaby, B.C.

B.C. Supreme Court has granted Kinder Morgan an indefinite injunction against pipeline protesters

On Saturday, March 17, 2018, Burnaby RCMP arrested several protesters for violating a court injunction that prohibits them from entering within five metres of a Kinder Morgan work site. (Bridgette Watson/CBC)

Police officers arrested a group of protesters who they said were violating the terms of an injunction recently granted to Kinder Morgan for its Trans Mountain pipeline work site in Burnaby, B.C.

The protesters were at the project's Burnaby Terminal, where an indefinite injunction prohibits them from entering within five metres of the work site. A few dozen more protesters were there in support of those who willingly violated the injunction. 

Burnaby RCMP said they arrested 28 people, who refused several requests to leave the area.

According to police, all of the arrested demonstrators have since been released, and are due to appear in court over the coming weeks.

A protester is led away from a Kinder Morgan work site in Burnaby B.C. on Saturday, March 17, 2018 after violating a court injunction. (Bridgette Watson/CBC)

Earlier in the afternoon, the group's spokesperson, Amina Moustaqim-Barrette, said the arrests had been peaceful.

"Police came in and explained what was going to happen and the protesters are cooperating and everything's very calm," she said. 

Moustaqim-Barrette said Saturday was the first of several days of protests against the pipeline expansion.

About 30 protesters were arrested for violating the terms of a recent injunction requiring them to keep at least five metres away from a Kinder Morgan work site in Burnaby, B.C., on Saturday. (Deborah Goble/CBC)

She said the protests will continue daily until at least March 26, the deadline by which Kinder Morgan has to clear trees in the area before birds begin nesting.

Moustaqim-Barrette said the protests, which are led by local First Nations, were also prompted in part by a rally last week that saw thousands of protesters gather against the pipeline expansion

Cam Fenton, with the Vancouver chapter of clean energy advocate 350.org, was also at the protest earlier in the day.

"This is sort of the beginning of a wave of this sort of action that we're going to see more and more of," Fenton said.

About 100 protesters gathered on Burnaby Mountain Saturday to voice opposing to the Trans Mountain pipeline. (Deborah Goble/CBC)

'They must respect the terms of the injunction'

Trans Mountain has said construction is expected to last until December 2020. 

In a written statement, a Kinder Morgan spokesperson said the company recognizes that not everyone supports the project. 

"A group of individuals has been regularly attempting to physically obstruct, impede and prevent work crews and equipment from entering our operations facilities and work sites, which is why we pursued, and were granted, an injunction in B.C. Supreme Court," said the company.

"While we support peaceful and lawful expressions about our Project, they must respect the terms of the injunction that is currently in place." 

Jason Kenney, leader of Alberta's United Conservative Party opposition party, also weighed in on the protest via Twitter. 

Kenney said "radical activists" shouldn't be allowed to delay "the approved Trans Mountain pipeline to death."

Burnaby RCMP said they are working hard to ensure that the rights of the demonstrators to lawful, peaceful and safe protest are respected, as well as the company's right to complete their work.