Taylor van Diest's mother organizes walk for slain teen

The mother of an Armstrong, B.C., teen killed on Halloween two years ago is leading a community walk on Thursday to the location where her daughter’s body was found.

Armstrong teen was beaten to death on Halloween night in 2011

Taylor van Diest was beaten to death on Halloween in 2011 while walking alone to meet a friend. (CBC)

The mother of an Armstrong, B.C., teen who was killed on Halloween two years ago is leading a community walk on Thursday to the location where her daughter’s body was found.

Taylor van Diest, 18, was found severely beaten beside some railroad tracks on Halloween night in 2011, and later died of her injuries in hospital.

Prior to the attack, van Diest was walking in her costume to meet a friend, whom she was texting back and forth with when she suddenly stopped texting.

After her death police arrested and charged Matthew Foerster, 27. He will stand trial in the spring next year for first-degree murder.

His 59-year-old father, Stephen Foerster, will stand trial for obstruction of justice and accessory to murder after the fact in connection with the killing.

Marie van Diest, Taylor’s mother, says she dreads Halloween every year now.

“I know it is going to be a very difficult day, but we'll get through it, we'll get through it,” she told CBC News.

The remembrance walk will end where Taylor’s body was found, which has now become a memorial to the slain teen.

Marie hopes that people of all ages will join her.

“Taylor just loved Halloween, and if anyone wants to wear a costume, we’re more than fine with that,” she says.

The walk is set to begin at 6 p.m. PT at the Armstrong Museum.

With files from the CBC's Brady Strachan

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