Storm warning: 'incredible' subtropical storms to drench B.C.

Environment Canada says an intense jet stream over the Pacific is gathering warm, moist air from southern latitudes that will bring close to 100 mm of rain to parts of B.C. this week.

Environment Canada warns residents to brace for heavy rain, high winds

Environment Canada is warning West Coast residents to brace for a series of storms that will bring heavy rain this week. (CBC)

Environment Canada is warning West Coast residents to brace for an "incredible" series of storms that will bring heavy rain this week.

Most of the downpours and the warm subtropical weather pattern "will bombard the mountains of Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland from Monday through Thursday morning" with close to 100 mm of rain, the weather service said. 

The succession of three storms this week is the result of an intense jet stream over the Pacific that is gathering warm, moist air from southern latitudes.

An intense jet stream over the Pacific is gathering warm, moist air from southern latitudes. (GOES-West/Environment Canada)

Metro Vancouver will, however, escape the worst of the storm, but residents can still expect up to 50 mm of rain, with the downpours easing off midday Tuesday. The west coast of Vancouver Island and Howe Sound are also forecast to get 50 mm of rain by Tuesday morning.

Before the rain arrives, heavy winds hitting 70 to 110 km/h are also forecast for the west coast of the island, the Sunshine Coast, the Central Coast and Haida Gwaii, during the day on Monday. These winds are expected to diminish early Tuesday morning as the system moves inland.

Crews of geotechnical engineers and hydrologists are also keeping a close eye on the Seymour River in North Vancouver, after a rock slide this weekend, in order to see if nearby houses are at risk.

The weather system is also forecast to push the freezing level up to 2,500 metres, adding snowmelt to flooding creeks and rivers in the mountains.

Residents are warned to watch out for flooding and water pooling on roads. Damage to buildings, such as to roof shingles and windows, may occur. Wooded areas should be avoided to prevent injury from falling trees or branches. 

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