Squamish makes New York Times list of 52 places to go in 2015

The main fuel stop on the Sea-to-Sky Highway between Whistler, B.C., and Vancouver is getting international attention as a place to do more than get gas and grab a coffee for the road.

Canada's self-proclaimed 'outdoor recreation capital of Canada' is more than a fuel stop

Hiking up the Stawamus Chief is one of the top attractions for tourists in Squamish. (Karl Woll)

The main fuel stop on the Sea-to-Sky Highway between Whistler, B.C., and Vancouver is getting international attention as a place to do more than get gas and grab a coffee for the road.

For years, Squamish has proclaimed itself "the outdoor recreation capital of Canada," and now the New York Times newspaper appears to agree.

The newspaper's travel section has put the once sleepy port at the head of Howe Sound on its list of 52 places to go in 2015. The paper cites the opening of the Sea to Sky Gondola last year as a reason to visit Squamish, and experience "an unusual combination of West Coast wilderness and accessibility."

The new Sea to Sky Gondola has become a popular draw for international tourists. (Sea to Sky Gondola)

The recent upgrades to the Sea-to-Sky Highway have also made the town a popular weekend destination for more and more Metro Vancouver residents.

With world-class rock climbing on the Stawamus Chief, hiking in Garibaldi Provincial Park, windsurfing and kite boarding at the Spit, mountain biking trails in the nearby woods, and eagle watching along the river, the town has plenty of reasons to brag.

But now it is no longer just a local destination, it would appear.

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