A B.C. judge has released the video of Matthew Foerster's interrogation by RCMP officers, in which he admits to killing Armstrong teen Taylor Van Diest.

On Saturday, a jury in Kelowna found Foerster guilty of first-degree murder.

Taylor Van Diest - archive photo

Taylor Van Diest died in hospital after she was beaten on Halloween night in Armstrong, B.C. (Facebook)

Taylor Van Diest went missing on Halloween night in 2011, after leaving home in the early evening to meet a friend.

When she didn't show up and stopped answering text messages, her family and friends launched a search.

She was found badly beaten by the side of railroad tracks, and died later in hospital.

A forensic pathologist testified in court that Van Diest died from one or more fatal blows to her head.

Foerster admitted in court, through his lawyer, to causing her injuries, and Crown counsel argued that Foerster caused those wounds while trying to sexually assault her.

RCMP investigate scene where Taylor Van Diest was found

Police combed the scene where Taylor Van Diest was found. (CBC)

Months after Van Diest died, and after being identified as a suspect, police located Foerster in Ontario and brought him back to B.C.

The following day, on April 6, 2012, Foerster was interrogated by the RCMP and the session was recorded on video.

The video was played back at Foerster's trial.

At one point in the video, Sgt. Mark Davidson asks, "Look me in the eye and tell me this. Do you feel bad about killing Taylor?"

"Yes," Foerster answers.

At another point during the interrogation, Davidson says, "You already told me that you didn't mean to, that that's not what you went for and it got out of hand. You told me that you went for sex and that if she hadn't fought you  you wouldn't have killed her, right? Is that all truthful?"

Matthew Foerster interrogation - RCMP video

RCMP Sgt. Mark Davidson is seen interrogating Matthew Foerster in this video image from April 6, 2012. (RCMP)

"Yes," Foerster says.

As the interrogation continues, Foerster has a short message for Van Diest's family.

"I guess I would like to say I was sorry. I am sorry to that effect, if that means anything," he says.

Forester's guilty conviction of first degree murder means he faces life in prison with no eligibility for parole for 25 years.

His lawyer did not indicate this weekend whether Foerster would be appealing the conviction.

With files from the CBC's Emily Elias and Brady Strachan