A sentencing hearing for two teenaged B.C. boys convicted of the murder of a female classmate has heard victim impact statements from the girl's family and an apology from one of the killers.

The two boys, who where 16 and 17 at the time of the murder in March 2010, lured Kimberly Proctor to one of the boy's homes.

They admitted sexually assaulting Proctor, 18, killing her and mutilating her body before stuffing it into a freezer. They then took the remains in a duffle bag onto a bus to a popular Victoria-area hiking trail, where they dumped the body and set it on fire.

"There truly is evil in the world and my daughter came face to face with that evil," said the victim's mother, Lucia Proctor.

'I think it's very scary to think that a couple of characters like this, with this kind of background, would be let loose on society.'—Psychologist Dr. Derek Swain

The court also heard a letter Tuesday from the boy who was 16 when he took part in the murder.

"I am deeply sorry for what I have done ... it will never happen again ... as I child I hated my father for what he had done."

The boy's father had been convicted of killing a 16-year-old girl.

The judge in the case must decide whether or not to sentence the two youths as adults. The pair, who pleaded guilty to first-degree murder, would serve a maximum of ten years if they were sentenced as young offenders.

Both teens were described in assessment reports as psychopaths with sexual deviance and conduct disorder.

One of the boys had trouble controlling his anger and his disdain for others from an early age.

Decision Monday

He got into fights in elementary school and in high school was expelled for hitting a boy in the head with a chain.

He was also charged with assaulting his mother in November 2009.

Although he had received counselling at various periods in his life, a court ordered that he be monitored to at least age 50.

There is little chance for rehabilitation in cases like this, psychologist Dr. Derek Swain told CBC News.

"I think it's very scary to think that a couple of characters like this, with this kind of background, would be let loose on society," said Swain. "I think it's very worrisome."

Defence lawyers for the teens said they would not argue against their clients being sentenced as adults.

The judge's decision is expected Monday.

With files from the CBC's Kirk Williams and Lisa Cordasco