Northern Gateway pipeline by the numbers

The Enbridge Northern Gateway Project Joint Review Panel has recommended the federal government approve the project. We take a look at some of the numbers in the controversial pipeline debate.

Review panel says project in best interest of Canadians

The proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline project is intended to move crude oil from Northern Alberta to the Pacific Coast. (Enbridge)

The Enbridge Northern Gateway Project Joint Review Panel has recommended the federal government approve the project, but with 209 conditions. We take a look at some of the numbers in the controversial pipeline debate.

Here are the numbers related to the proposed pipeline:

  • 3 feet - the diameter of the pipeline that would carry oil from Alberta to the Pacific Coast.
  • 10% – the share of the project ownership offered to First Nations and Métis.
  • 20 inches – the diameter of the pipeline that would carry condensate back to Northern Alberta.
  • 220 tankers – the number of cargo ships that would be loaded with crude oil each year in Kitimat.
  • 560  jobs – the number of long-term jobs the pipeline would provide.
  • 1,177 km – the distance the pipeline would stretch from the oil sands to the Pacific Ocean.
  • 3,000 – the number of workers needed to build the pipeline.
  • 520,000 barrels – the amount of oil the pipeline would carry each day.
  • $1.2 billion – the amount of tax revenue promised to B.C. over the next 30 years.
  • $2.4 billion – the lower estimate of the economic cost of a major tanker spill on the West Coast
  • $6.5 billion – the number of dollars the project is expected to cost.
  • $9.5 billion – the highest estimate of the economic cost of a major tanker spill on the West Coast.

(Sources: Enbridge Northern Gateway Project, UBC Fisheries Economic Research Unit.)

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