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No evidence in Furlong molestation allegations, say RCMP

A woman who alleges she was sexually assaulted by former Vancouver Olympics organizing committee CEO John Furlong says the RCMP informed her they found no evidence the assaults took place.

RCMP told accuser they can find no evidence to suggest assaults took place

RCMP told Beverly Abraham they have found no evidence to support her allegations of sexual abuse at the hands of former VANOC chief John Furlong at a northern B.C. elementary school in the late '60s and early '70s. (CBC)

A woman who alleges she was sexually assaulted by former Vancouver Olympics organizing committee CEO John Furlong says the RCMP informed her they found no evidence the assaults took place.

Beverly Abraham, 55, claimed in a civil suit filed in July that Furlong molested her approximately 12 times in 1969 and 1970 while he was a physical education teacher at Immaculata Roman Catholic Elementary School in Burns Lake, B.C.

Furlong says he never abused her or another student who has made similar accusations. He has not been convicted of any offence relating to the allegations. 

Abraham said that two weeks ago an RCMP investigator informed her they have found no evidence of the incidents and so cannot move forward with any charges.

"It's really, honestly, hurting me. It's hurting my heart so bad. It's like broken into a million pieces now, and it hurts my stomach. It's just like someone touching me all over again," she said.

Abraham said she believes that RCMP investigators only spoke to her 90-year-old mother, who suffers from dementia, in regard to her allegations.

The RCMP issued a statement that its investigation into the allegations was independently reviewed by major crime investigators from another province, but that the file remains open.

Abraham insists she will continue with her civil suit against Furlong.

A spokesperson for Furlong declined to make any comment to CBC News, and indicated that Furlong would issue a statement on Tuesday.

With files from the CBC's Curt Petrovich

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