New rapid flashing beacon pedestrian crossing system coming to Vancouver

The City of Vancouver is setting up a new kind of pedestrian crossing as part of a pilot project to help residents get across busy streets in three different locations.

Pedestrians can activate the rapid flashing beacon to warn drivers of their presence

The City of Vancouver is installing three rapid flashing beacon pedestrian crossings, like this one in Aloha, Ore. (Eric O'Brien/Flickr)

The City of Vancouver is setting up a new kind of pedestrian crossing as part of a pilot project to help residents get across busy streets at three different crosswalk locations.

With the new system, known as a rapid flashing beacon, pedestrians can use a push button to activate a high-intensity amber beacon light when they want to cross.

The city hopes the light will signal to drivers and cyclists that a pedestrian is crossing and make it safer for pedestrians to venture into intersections where drivers rarely let people cross.

An example of a pedestrian crossing with a rapid flashing beacon in Davis, Calif. (Lara Justine/Flickr)

The new lights are being installed this week at:

  • Victoria Drive and Grant Street (near Victoria Park)
  • West Boulevard and 42nd Avenue (near Kerrisdale Community Centre)
  • Elliot Street and Waverly Avenue (near Waverly Elementary School and Nanaimo Park)

In a news release, the city said the system has already been tested in B.C.'s Lower Mainland, including Surrey, New Westminster and Port Moody and is already in use in Portland, Washington D.C. and other large U.S. cities.

Map of new rapid flashing beacons in Vancouver

Watch video of rapid flashing beacons in Aloha, Ore.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.