Mega iLL medical marijuana pizzeria expanding menu without business licence

A Vancouver pizzeria that grabbed headlines around the world for serving pot-infused food says it's expanding the menu, despite lacking a business license.

Vancouver restuarant sells special slices to people with medicinal marijuana prescriptions

Mega iLL pizzeria serves up slices with an extra special ingredient — if you're over 18 and have been prescribed marijuana by a doctor. (CBC)

A Vancouver pizzeria that grabbed headlines around the world for serving pot-infused food says it's expanding the menu, despite lacking a business license.

Mega iLL, on Kingsway at Fraser, serves up slices with an extra special ingredient — if you're over 18, have been prescribed marijuana by a doctor and pay an extra $10.

But the City of Vancouver says the restaurant is ineligible for a business licence because it promotes unauthorized food and smoking.

Mega iLL owner Mark Klokeid claims he wasn't aware of the problem, until CBC reporter Jason Proctor brought it to his attention.

"I'm going to go down to the city...and see what the heck their problem is," Klokeid said.

The city says Mega iLL is violating health bylaws and is a "serious concern" for staff and patrons. 

Coastal Health's Anna Marie D'Angelo says the authority has inspected Mega iLL and is working on improving a food safety plan with them.

Meanwhile, Klokeid says his pizzeria is about to ramp up its food offerings and his customers are using vapourizers, not smoking.

"We need to have a safe place for people to use cannabis and I think it's only natural that we have vapour lounges and restaurants where people can safely take their medicine," said Klokeid.

"[Take] alcohol establishments — people are allowed to drink and we don't want anyone under 19 going into those establishments and it's the same thing with cannabis."

Marijuana-infused oil is drizzled on a pizza before it goes in the oven. The special ingredients costs $10 more per order. (CBC)

With files from the CBC's Jason Proctor

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