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Lemmy Kilmister of Motörhead remembered by biggest Vancouver fan

When Motörhead frontman Lemmy Kilmister died on Monday, outpourings of grief came from around the world. In Vancouver, few are taking it as hard as Twan Halliday.

Twan Halliday plays Lemmy in the Motörhead tribute group Snaggletooth

Motörhead frontman Lemmy Kilmister died on Monday of cancer at age 70. Twan Halliday plays the now-departed rock god in the Vancouver-based Motörhead tribute band Snaggletooth. (Joel Ryan/Invision/The Associated Press)

When Motörhead frontman Ian "Lemmy" Kilmister died at the age of 70 on Monday, music fans across the globe were deeply saddened by his loss.

In Vancouver, few are taking it as hard as Twan Halliday.

"I was in shock. I didn't think it would happen," he told On The Coast guest host Laura Lynch. "It's Lemmy, right? I thought he was going to live forever."

Halliday is perhaps Lemmy's biggest fan in Vancouver. He even plays Lemmy in the Motörhead tribute band Snaggletooth — complete with trademark mutton chops, and, of course, he looks straight upwards when he sings.

  • WARNING: The following video contains language some readers may find offensive

    Who needs a bed when you've got Motörhead?

    Motörhead played in Vancouver many times over the years; Halliday first saw them perform in 1996.

    "I was a fan after I first heard them, but when you see 'em live it's something special. … Not faked, not contrived, not put on, not made up, not posing, just being himself," he said.

    "I sold my king-size bed, traded it for two tickets, me and my buddy went. It was my birthday present. I went up front row, went right up to the railing and held on for dear life and was just blown away. After the third song, my ears popped."

    Seeing the band perform live got Halliday back into music after a 10-year hiatus (which he spent pursuing professional wrestling).

    "It's a hard go some nights. those are big shoes to fill," he said. "I'm blessed that people accept us and rock out with the songs."

    Gotta love the muttonchops. Twan Halliday performs as Lemmy with Snaggletooth (Snaggletooth/Facebook)

    'Go forth and spread the word'

    Halliday got to meet Lemmy a few times, including when Motörhead played in Abbotsford. He went backstage and told his idol about his band and their upcoming tour of Canada.

    "He gave me his blessing and said, 'Go forth my son, and spread the word of Motörhead,'" Halliday said.

    "There's a whole bunch of tribute bands from around the world … we all do it out of respect for Motörhead and Lemmy.

    "We don't do it to try and be stars or famous or anything else. We just do it because we love the music and love the man."

    Halliday says that he was always touched by the way Lemmy took time for him and other fans. He said that when he met Lemmy for the first time, the rocker chatted with him and another five fans for 10 minutes in the pouring rain.

    "He stood and talked to each one of us in the pouring rain. He didn't have to. But he took the time to acknowledge us," he said.

    Halliday says to honour Lemmy, he bought a bottle of Jack Daniels, his favourite whiskey.

    He says he'll take a drink and pour one out for the departed rock god.

    You're not seeing double: Twan Halliday (left) with his idol, the real Lemmy Kilmister. (Snaggletooth/Facebook)

    To hear the full story, click the audio labelled: Motörhead's Lemmy Kilmister remebered by his Vancouver counterpart

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