It’s the tournament capital of Canada, a destination for outdoor enthusiasts — and in every election since 1903, Kamloops has sent a government MLA to Victoria.

Voters on the ground in the southern Interior riding say a mix of interests will help inform their vote.

"For me, I would say it's a job," one woman told CBC News. "Like, having just finished university it's being able to stay in B.C. and feel like you need to move to Alberta."

"The environment is a big issue for me," said another voter. "I'm concerned about that and the lack of interest."

In 2009, Liberal Kevin Krueger, who isn’t running again, won Kamloops-South Thompson by a healthy margin, taking about 54 per cent of the vote.

But in Kamloops-North Thompson, Liberal Terry Lake won by just over 500 votes. He's banking on the Liberals' economic plan to get re-elected.

"People are working, the economy is more diverse, there's been huge investments in the community," he said. "So I think people say, 'Why would we change?'"

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In every provincial election since 1903, Kamloops has sent a government MLA to Victoria. (CBC)

But change is the word NDP candidate Kathy Kendall is hearing.

"I'm not hearing from people that things are good," she said. "I'm hearing from people that they're struggling on a daily basis to deal with the cost of childcare or finding work that pays a family supporting wage."

For more than 100 years, the province has followed Kamloops’ choice of government. It remains to be seen if voters will stick with that tradition or buck the trend and have their MLAs sit opposite the government on May 14.